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Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah Logo Meaning

The Tribal seal was adopted by Tribal Resolution 97-20 on May 13, 1997 and signed into law by Tribal Chairwoman Geneal Anderson. The design was done with the sacred colors, White; purity, light and mourning, Red; power and protection Yellow; healing, strength, life Black; strength and power. The seal is used on the floor of the Tribal gymnasium and is incorporated into the Tribe’s headquarters in Cedar City, Utah.

The Tribal seal is a ring of two lines; on it an eagle, symbolic of the deity, flies in front of the map of Utah. In the southwestern corner an arrowhead pinpoints the Tribe’s location (the Paiutes are known for their arrowheads). To the left of the eagle is a pair of gourd rattles which represents the Paiute’s traditional Salt Song and Bird Songs. To the right is a hand drum which represents the traditional Circle Dance songs and the Hand Game songs. At the base of the map are three “Hand Game” sticks. The object of the “Hand Game” is a guessing game, and is popular for intertribal or local competition in which the Paiutes have a reputation among surrounding tribes for their hand game skills, and still played to this day. The Tribal seal was designed by Paiute Tribal member Travis N. Parashonts at the request of the Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah Tribal Council.

Hanging from the seal, making it resemble a warrior’s shield, are five decorated eagle feathers which represents the five constituent Paiute Bands of the Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah. Arching above the top is the official name “Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah”. Inside the shield, below the “Hand Game” sticks, is “Federally Recognized April; 3, 1980”, showing the paramount importance of Restoration to the Tribe.

The name PAIUTE has been translated to mean either “Water Utes” or “True Utes” alluding to their past union as one people with that Tribe (ENAT, 174-176).